Blog

  • Sport improves concentration and quality of life

    Physically fit primary school pupils feel better and can concentrate better. They are more likely to make it to higher-level secondary grammar schools than children with less sporting abilities. This has been confirmed for the first time in a study by the Department of Sport and Health Sciences at the Technical University of Munich (TUM).

    Read more

  • Broken Forearm: Radius, Ulna, and Both Bone Fractures

    A forearm fracture occurs when there is a fracture of one or both of the bones of the forearm. The two bones of the forearm are the radius and the ulna. Both bones are important for proper motion of the elbow and wrist joints, and both bones serve as important attachments to muscles of the upper extremity.

    Read more

  • 4 Common Conditions That Affect Your Toes

    Common toe problems, including bunions, tailor's bunion (or bunionette), hammertoes, and hallux limitus, can be caused by abnormal foot anatomy and function as well as too-small footwear.

    Read more

  • Stiff shoulders after rotator cuff repair may be less likely to require revision surgery

    Patients with stiff shoulders after rotator cuff repair were more likely to be satisfied with their repair and less likely to require revision surgery than patients without stiff shoulders, according to results presented here.

    Read more

  • Exercising With Knee Pain: Do's and Don'ts

    Plenty of studies show the enormous benefits of regular exercise on knee health and the protective advantages it can offer in keeping the structures, tissues and ligaments of the knee protected from damage now, and later in life. As long as you clear it with your physician first, you might be surprised at the knee pain relief and active lifestyle benefits that can come with introducing exercise into your daily routine.

    Read more

  • Steroid injections may provide longer lasting benefits for hip pain than current best care

    Steroid injections appear to lead to significantly greater pain relief and movement for up to four months than current best care in adults with hip osteoarthritis, finds a trial published by the BMJ today.

    Read more

  • How long should a concussed athlete be sidelined?

    What factors predict recovery time for an athlete who has suffered a concussion? A new study has some answers. As the Stanford University authors wrote, “Prognosticating recovery times for individual athletes with a concussion remains a challenge for health care providers. Several preinjury and postinjury factors have been proposed to be predictive of prolonged return-to-play times, but the data in this area are still sparse.”

    Read more

  • Knee Replacement in Folks Over 80: Less Risky Than You Think

    Knee replacement surgery is increasingly common among people over 80 sidelined with knee pain, and the procedure isn't as hazardous for them as often assumed. That's the main message from a new study of more than 1.7 million seniors who underwent knee replacement surgery.

    Read more

  • Total knee replacement may be more painful for vitamin-D deficient postmenopausal women

    Vitamin D is a critical part of a healthy diet. Among other benefits, it has been shown to protect against bone disease and maintain soft tissue health. A new study suggests that it may also play a role in the degree of postoperative pain postmenopausal women experience after undergoing total knee replacement.

    Read more

  • How to Ease Back into Exercise Safely After a Long Break

    The stress and uncertainty of the past year, along with the closure of many gyms and need for physical distancing, have thrown off many people’s workout routines..After taking a long break from physical activity, most people will not be able to perform at the same level they once did. It’s important to manage expectations and set realistic goals when easing back into exercise after a break.

    Read more

Pages [1] 2 3 4 5 6 of 8 | Next | Last